Video interview: the anti tar sands movement, Fort McMurray fire and climate change

The tar sands in Fort McMurray, Alberta. Photo credit: Kris Krug via Flickr.

By Anders Lorenzen

With the recent devastating Fort McMurray forest fires, the controversy surrounding the tar sands industry has been creeping back up to the surface.


The tar sands project has been described by many as ‘the largest infrastructure project on the planet’; environmental campaigners just call it the most destructive energy project on earth. The project is so large that it can be seen from space. The town of Fort McMurray is the home of the tar sands industry, housing many of the oil workers and infrastructure equipment involved in the project. As I write, production is still halted and oil workers are still being evacuated as the fire is starting to near oil refineries and infrastructure. Research suggests that the fire has so far cost the tar sands industry $760 million in lost earnings.


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On Tuesday 10th May, I spoke to activist and writer, Derek Leahy, (see above) about his involvement in the early campaign against tar sands when he co-founded the International Tar Sands Day. We also talked about the potential link between Fort McMurray fire and climate change, whether it was a wake-up call for the Canadian authorities to do more to tackle this risk, and who should lead the fight.


Climate induced wildfires turned out of control in tar sands heartland – video

Could the Alberta election result hurt tar sands development?

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