Picture series: Greenpeace highlights the fragile state of Indonesia’s oceans and forests

Pictures: Paul Hilton

Source: Greenpeace International

A black-capped lory (Nuri Kepala Hitam) is seen in the outskirts of Manokwari, Papua, Indonesia.  © Paul Hilton / Greenpeace
Today on International Day for Biological Diversity, Greenpeace International highlights the fragile state of Indonesia’s oceans and forests with a stunning set of photos captured by World Press Photo winner Paul Hilton.

A leatherback turtle heads out to sea after laying eggs on Jamursba Medi beach, Tambrau District, West Papua, Indonesia. 

© Paul Hilton / Greenpeace


The environmental NGO says that it’s clear how marine and forest life is being impacted by industrial overfishing and relentless deforestation.

“Indonesia is home to some of the richest biodiversity spots on Earth, but continued land clearance  to make way for industrial plantations and overfishing of our country’s oceans are putting this all at risk,” said Greenpeace Indonesia’s Country Director, Longgena Ginting.

Bumphead parrot fish at Dampier Straight, Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia.  © Paul Hilton / Greenpeace.
A Papuan tree frog is pictured on a fern in a forest on the outskirts of Manokwari, Papua.  © Paul Hilton / Greenpeace.

Approximately 10% of the world’s rainforests are located in Indonesia. Fifty years ago, 82% of Indonesia was covered with forests but in the last decade, this has dropped to 48% due to relentless deforestation for paper and palm oil plantations and mining.

Whale sharks in Cenderawasih Bay National Park. © Paul Hilton / Greenpeace.
Mountain forests on the outskirts of Manokwari, Papua, Indoneisa.  © Paul Hilton / Greenpeace.
Starfish in the pristine reefs in Cenderawasih Bay National Park.  

© Paul Hilton / Greenpeace.

A coral reef at Dampier Straight, Raja Ampat, Papua, Indonesia. © Paul Hilton / Greenpeace.


Indonesia’s seas are also among the most diverse coastal and marine habitats. Areas like Raja Ampat, in West Papua, are claimed to be among the richest spots in biodiversity on Earth. The country’s coral reefs are considered to be among the world’s most threatened biodiversity hotspots, at risk from overfishing, pollution and climate change.

  

Mountain forests on the outshirts of Manokwari, Papua, Indonesia.

© Paul Hilton / Greenpeace.










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One response to “Picture series: Greenpeace highlights the fragile state of Indonesia’s oceans and forests

  1. Pingback: Earth Day 2017 – A focus on sustainable palm oil plantation | A greener life, a greener world·

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